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is on the path to defeat. >> we decimated the leaders. >> on the path to defeat and osama bin laden is dead. >> we decimated al qaeda central, eliminated osama bin laden. >> al qaeda is much weaker than it was when i came into office. >> osama bin laden is dead, and general motors as a live. >> the war in afghanistan is coming to a close. al qaeda is on the path to the feet. osama bin laden is dead. >> today the core of al qaeda in afghanistan and pakistan is on the path of the feet. the remaining operators spend more time thinking about their own safety and plotting against us. lou: joining us now, radio talk-show host, fox news contributor, former reagan political director, fox is political analyst. thank you both for being here. a defeat for al qaeda, and today we are watching the united states close 19 of our facilities in the middle east and north africa. your reaction? >> my reaction is that the president obviously did what he thought he had to to get reelected instead of talking in terms of an ongoing threat. he made some progress, but it's an ongoing threat that will be the the rest
is that there was some kind of electronic intercept between at least two top al qaeda leaders. the successor of osama bin laden , and the head of the yemen branch of al qaeda. a source telling fox news, the message involved old-fashioned means we have seen al qaeda use before, including tory ears and that the message was circulated to a number of key al qaeda members. so, yes, intelligence officials are joining in the administration's war on words of fighting over whether the al qaeda uses conference calls or chat rooms and will lay of some of the measurable absurdity of it all tonight in the "chalk talk." also ahead, retired four-star army general and former army vice chief of staff, general jack keenan joins us to weigh in and now the white house is handling the security threats. what, a different type of threat that could potentially wipe out all cell phone communications, and injuring gps navigation and radio and television transmissions and all the while having the power to knock out this nation's power grid. we begin with the president making his first public statements on his administration's late
is on the run and osama bin laden is dead. >> reporter: the white house aide said the cia director and other officials noted al qaeda affiliates were gaining steam. >> did he give the full picture to the people in the campaign about the threat of al qaeda, when that was his talking about again and again? >> it is indisputable the elimination of osama bin laden was a major accomplishment in the effort against al qaeda. we have been clear and the president has been clear that the threat from al qaeda very much remains. >> reporter: republicans know al qaeda in the arabian peninsula is its deadliest affiliate of all. >> al qaeda is in many ways stronger than 9/11, because it mutated and spread and come at us different directions. >> reporter: tense times in the mid east, where the u.s. is having talks in egypt with a jailed senior leader of muslim brotherhood, amid fears the government is losing control of key cities. >> that will allow the sinai to become as you said wild west of terrorism where groups like al qaeda and hamas can coordinate and plot attacks. >> reporter: as the egyptian govern
tracked osama bin laden leading up to the raid that took his life. >>> and the nfl prepares to pay out millions of dollars to players suffering from head trauma. just by talking to a helmet. it grabbed the patient's record before we even picked him up. it found out the doctor we needed was at st. anne's. wiggle your toes. [ driver ] and it got his okay on treatment from miles away. it even pulled strings with the stoplights. my ambulance talks with smoke alarms and pilots and stadiums. but, of course, it's a good listener too. [ female announcer ] today cisco is connecting the internet of everything. so everything works like never before. individualization that your body needs. this labor day, don't invest in a mattress until you visit a sleep number store. when we actually lower the sleep number setting to get the sleep number bed to conform to them, it's amazing the transition that you see with people. oh, that feels really good.it's hugging my body. they just look at you like you cured all the problems they've ever had. we hear it all the time: "i didn't know a bed could feel like t
. >>gretchen: let's talk a little bit about what's being revealed about the night of the osama bin laden raid. >>brian: there is something we don't know? >>gretchen: there's photos coming out of the situation room. hillary clinton had her hand over her mouth and everyone was at ten alternative and we're watching -- was attentive and we're watching leon panetta give them the breakdown of what happened in that raid. apparently osama bin laden was killed around 3 p.m. washington, d.c. time. remember the president came out late that night, somewhere around 10 or 11 to say to the american public osama bin laden had been killed. now his former personal assistant is saying in an interview that later on at night the president was doing something that some people might be surprised at. >> typically like the weekends he'll work like a half day. and this sunday, i mean we worked -- i mean, we were there until almost, i think he went on tv at midnight, almost midnight, and sat around in the private dining room kind of like -- most people were in the situation room and he was like i'm not going to be down
cruikshank says there's a new twist: al qaeda's leader in yemen-- once osama bin laden's personal secretary -- is reportedly now the second in command in the organization world wide. emily schmidt: is this an his mark? paul cruickshank: it may well be this a naser al- wuhayshi's coming out party as the number two of al qaeda. the plot was in this works as this announcement was going to come out that he was playing this bigger role in they al qaeda global terrorist network. president obama stuck to his planned weekend schedule--golfing, and going to camp david for his birthday. a white house official says the president will continue to be updated about the threat through the weekend. the white house says it will notcomment on intelligence in this case-- particularly as it relates to a new york times report that says some of this intelligence came from intercepted electronic communications between senior al qaeda operatives. emily schmidt kron4 news. the obama administration is overturning a looming ban on older apple iphones and ipads. the ban was put in place by the international trade comm
know, just a year ago, boasting al-qaeda is on the run, osama bin laden is dead, and now an unprecedented closure of 22 embassies. the travel alert, which lasts for a month, which incidentally, i'm not sure people understand, the state department hates to do that. this is the highest level -- the travel advisories they do routinely. travel alert, every host government dislikes that. it cuts tourism. they're objecting to the ambassadors there. the ambassadors are cabling back to the state department, travel alert, are you sure we have to do that? for the u.s. government, the state department to issue a travel alert for the next month means about the threat is serious. >> chris: senator demint, the president was criticized heavily last september after benghazi for not doing enough. is it fair now to criticize him for doing too much? >> well, it's clear that al-qaeda may be more of a threat to us they were before 9/11 now. we don't know exactly what all the intelligence is, but as you've heard from a lot of the experts on both sides the aisle in congress, there's a real thre
osama bin laden -- rhetorical bluster didn't bring osama bin laden. actual intelligence and aggressive maneuvers inside of pakistan did. i don't think the former dictators in libya or in egypt would think that this president has been weak. i think what we've seen is a president who has tried to get the united states to conform and comport with the sort of moral standing that -- >> i don't think -- now i feel i need to counter on the other side, because the fact of the matter is barack obama has adopted policies that i think have actually been less targeted. he will fire drones into countries where we aren't even at war. when we had a plan, a policy, a program that would allow us to go and snatch terrorists out like khalid sheikh mohammed. bring them out without killing their 4-year-old daughters, without killing their grandmothers, without killing everybody in the general vicinity. and i've got to say, nothing that he has done has made us comport to international standards more than under george w. bush or dick cheney. in fact, you look at a lot of these countries, and america's approv
al qaeda is on the run and osama bin laden is dead. now an unprecedented closure and a travel alert which lasts for a month. the state department hates to do that the. the travel advisory they do. travel alert, every host government dislikes that. it cuts tourism. they are objecting to the ambassadors there cabling back to the state department saying, travel alert, are you sure we have to do that? to issue a travel alert for the next month means the threat is serious. >> senator demint the president was criticized heavily last september after benghazi for not doing enough. is it fair to criticize him for doing too much? >> it's clear al qaeda may be more of a threat to us than they were before 9/11. as you have heard from the experts on both sides he aisle in congress, there is a very real threat there. i'm not questioning what he's doing. i think what bill is saying is true. our attempt to placate parts of the world, reset whether it's russia or somewhere else are clearly not working. the perception of weakness in the administration is encouraging this kind of behavior. >> juan, wh
osama bin laden to the others, before they joined and formed al qaeda. guess which group they belong to a? the muslim brotherhood. ladies and gentlemen, i'm here to tell you that the muslim brotherhood is the gateway drug to islamic terrorism. if you want to understand this mayhem and why we are up against against the wall with the war on terror come along strangle him the existential struggle to judeo-christian, i'm sitting in the capital they do not like like to hear that into this at a premium. but that is what is going on. if you want to understand what we're up against, you have to understand this group. it started with them. it looked to be very politically incorrect and i have plenty of theological emma to back up their ideology matters of fact. so the founder is crestfallen and deflated that the group has collapsed. the caliphate. picture every muslim nation economically, politically, militarily, speaking with one strong voice against israel and america. controlling a good supply of the world's oil and perhaps if things keep regressing or regress in the way that they have bee
osama bin waed is dead does not mean al qaeda is dead be cleared out 20 embassies around the world to move this tax out by the way we caot say evacuate. it was the orderly departure th know what igoing on and they are gting troubled by the fact that the lexicon has reached every part of the admistration whether iras iras, defense department, war on terror, they will call it their own dictionary still believe we should move the white house california since we hear national security on jay leno? give me a break he cannot talk to the press corps but he sits down with jay leno? lou: that the term radical islamist should not be used or the war on terror or the overseas contingency operation. the list goes on and on and to talk with jay leno i am sure you both notice he did as a radical islamist but violent radical extremi and violent extremist and did not even refer to a terrorist or radical is law becaus frankly this adminiration does not have the intellectuals o individual courage to speak graham -- pled the to the american people to the enemies are and that is deeply deeply irritati
had been worth despite osama bin lauden. where do we draw the line? >> i think not just the ambiguous outcomes in the wars in afghanistan but also the libyan situation in which they thought we were doing good in the world, and we helped overthrow gaddafi, and then we had ambassador chris stevens, who was really a hero in the benghazi area killed in that very city when he was ambassador and then they have seen egypt and yemen erupt and i think they writely believed that america's apparent america'sability to flinfluencee evenltsdz would be limited and it's costly to try. >> almost a year anniversary of the benghazitac. it was airstrikes on libya. that was what many are proposing now for syria, and now, it seems like the situation in libya is much worse than it was under gaddafi in certain ways. >> i think any time you get involved in a war, you cannot entirely predict the outcome. so i think there is certainly a war weariness in the u.s. but a war wariness as well. people really are worried about these sorts of things. but i do believe that the use of chemical weapons, the use of these
on the people who actually attacked us on 9/11. today al qaeda is on the run and osama bin laden is dead. >> there are reports, too, the leader who replaced osama bin laden has given two speeches saying the muslim world needs to unite, said he disagrees with the u.s. policy going on in egypt as well. also, this is the 27th day of ramadan, also known as the night of power, the time when moham d mohammed -- if you're a believer, when mohammed got the first versus for the koran. >> the massive prison brakes across the region. >> not everybody believes al qaeda is on the run. >> apparently al qaeda doesn't agree. they strung more than 1,000 people from prisons in various countries. >> last week. >> 1200 prisoners in a single break. >> benghazi. >> how do you do that? >> a massive one at abu ghraib prison in iraq, too. here is the general on the al qaeda threat that we face. >>. >> certainly after 9/11 we clearly had al qaeda on the run because we responded to quickly to that threat and intercepted a lot of other threats and killed a bunch of leaders in the process. they have had time to reg
truck bombings. it also marked the first time many americans ever heard the name osama bin laden. of course, september 11th is a critical date not only for the 2001 attacks on america but also the deadly attack on the u.s. mission in benghazi, libya, one year ago. the state department says it's closing 21 u.s. embassies and consulates on sunday out of an abundance of caution. one official telling us the shutdown could be extended beyond sunday. here is our senior international correspondent arwa damon. she's outside the american embassy in cairo. >> reporter: behind this wall is one of the roads that leads to the u.s. embassy in cairo. normally the embassy would have been open on a sunday. it is a working day here. it will, however, be closed because of those security concerns. in the past there have been demonstrations here. there have been mobs, angry mobs, who have gathered trying to attack the embassy. september 11th of last year, for example, an incensed crowd, angered over the film that insulted prophet mohammed, tried to attack the embassy and it was the same day we saw th
been killed or captured and for of them successor of osama bin laden and that remains at large. in a strange day in the court martial of the fort hood gunman. the stand by attorneys for nidal hasan said if hasan wants the death.they should not have to help him as much as they have been thus far. we'll talk about it with the former prosecutors and defense attorneys. great to have you here. it sounds like hasan's attorneys who are helping him because he is representing himself believe he is actively trying to get the death.and they want no part of it. so can they recuse themselves or whatever the words for this? >> i don't see basis for it. the way it is going forward is unusual, i do agree with. that but the attorneys to take a position that they simply can't participate in this. i don't think it is a great argument to make. the reason i say. that attorneys help all of the time in individuals pleading guilty to something they did. that is what hasan is doing here and there is nothing unethiccal. all they are required to do is make sure the evident is support. it >> he was not al
to hear from the perpetrator himself. other than the occasional video from osama bin laden and the like, often those who commit horrific acts are kept from the lime light and disappear forever, like the aurora shooter or the boston marathon bomber. but today we all got a long, hard look at evil. we heard man, ariel castro, who pleaded guilty to unspeakable crimes to three young girls and their children. he tried to apologize, federal budget after -- even after he l distinct impression he didn't do anything that wrong. >> i have an addiction, just like an alcoholic has an addiction. alcoholics cannot control their addiction. that's why i couldn't control my addiction, your honor. these accusations that i would come home and beat her, beat them, those are totally wrong, your honor. because, like i said before, i am not a violent person. i'm not a violent person. i simply kept them there without allowing them to leave. >> it reminded some of us of that famous phrase, the benality of evil. and while what castro said today was infuriating and what he it was incomprehensible, you might not th
to coordinate, and if osama bin laden was calling someone in the united states, we n't his stockbroker.hat because people need to know that the government is not going to gary all this information on them and one day in the future use it against them or have it leaked. this is a legitimate issue, and balancing those is not easy, and i think what we're struggling with as a country, how to protect americans and also protect their individual liberties and private expectations. it's not a trivial issue. >> neil: looks like republican are having a hard time reconciling those two extremes to hear senator paul tell it, if we're getting these constant reports out of the nsa that it went beyond just collecting over 115 million american phone records, to the latest news that is was every e-mail, every site folks went on so much information, so fast, they really couldn't even hold it that long because it was too massive to hold. that does raise the kind of concerns that senator paul has had, that chris christie seems to dismiss. >> but first of all, of course, we always need to be reviewing the s
qaeda is on its heels and osama bin laden is dead. >> reporter: republicans say telling the truth about benghazi might have undermined a case for re-election. >> the american people are owed an apology for the misinformation that went on for weeks. >> reporter: the white house chafes at any suggestion of a coverup. >> the fact that this keeps on getting churned out, frankly has a lot to do with political motivations. >> reporter: there is no disputing this, the explanations have, at times, been inconsistent, conflicting and inaccurate. >> what we do know is that the natural protests that was the outrage over the video was used as an excuse by extremists. >> i heard hillary clinton say it was an act of terrorism. what do you say? >> we're still doing an investigation. there's no doubt that the kind of weapons that were used, the ongoing assault that it wasn't just a mob action. >> reporter: exhibit a in this debate is these benghazi talking points used by ambassador rice when she made the sunday show rounds. >> the whole issue of talking points, frankly throughout this process, has been
books on al qaeda. he produced the first tv interview of osama bin laden back in 1997. gregory johnsen is the author of the last refuge, yemen, al qaeda and america's war in arabia. welcome. peter, what triggered all of this as far as we understand it is the head of al qaeda sent a message to al qaeda in the arabian peninsula, in yemen, asking them, you know, do some terrorism, please. >> yeah, do something. >> now, is that a sign of weakness or strength? >> it's a sign of just sending a message. i mean it's do something is pretty -- it's not like, you know, the end of the world is coming. and so far whatever that something is hasn't transpired. and i think that al qaeda central is aware of its own problems and even al qaeda in the arabian peninsula is not doing particularly well, despite all of the flurry of things we've seen over the past week. about 30 of their leaders and south operatives have been killed in cia drone strikes, so their bench is thinning. >> why has yemen become the next place, after afghanistan, pakistan? >> right. well, i think in yemen you have a very weak centra
americans hear the name al jazeera, they think of the network that once aired osama bin laden videos. today, the organization financed by qatar's royal family is launching out with al jazeera america, and they opened the checkbook to hire established tv anchors like john significant enthat you willer, soledad o'brien, halle val chee. >> we know audiences wanted to hear more, know more. there are more stories out there, don't get to see them on the television network. >> reporter: they bought their way into 50 million cable homes by purchasing al gore's current tv for half a billion dollars. today, hillary clinton talking about its parent network for endorsement of sorts. >> viewership of al jazeera is going up in the united states because it is real news. >> reporter: initial newscasts lacking the depth promised. >> the president convened top officials. egypt has to be at the top of that agenda. >> no question about it. >> i returned from the northern front of this massive fire, beaver creek fire. >> reporter: not much different so far from what you may see on fox news, cnn, or msnbc. can t
of afghanistan and pakistan. that is no longer the case. osama bin laden is no longer their plotting against the u.s. and our allies. a does not mean there is not continuing threat posed by al qaeda, but that does not mean but that threat has changed because of the president's willingness to use force. there are other ways to work with the international community to reach objectives. the president took a trip to africa where he highlighted some of the strong relationships the united states has there. this is the work that the president vowed to do when he took office, which is to rebuild some of the relationships that were in tatters when this president entered the oval office. that strengthens the united states on the international scene. it is good for broader national security interests. but it is something that the president and members of his team have to work on something -- have to work on every day. >> more than 100,000 people have been killed. that is effectively like wiping out the entire city of south bend, indiana. how many more people need to die before the u.s. does employ some
administration after the bombing of our embassies, osama bin laden concluded america was unserious with the course. three years later, we had 9/11. >> you have to ask the question, is limited punitive strike worse than doing nothing. i am not sure that's true. >> then there's the libya example, they sent in 110 tomahawk missiles, british and u.s. war ships, then there was a nato enforced fly zone for six months, which ended with a civil war with gadhafi being deposed. the problem with syria is more complicated because the rebel situation is more complicated. and you've got the potentially unsecure wmd of chemicals. >> we're going to continue this. final word on this topic? >> i think it is a question of are you serious or not. assad will understand it is a punitive strike, he emerges from the smoke essentially unhurt strategically, he wins this round. and it will have been for nothing and risking all of the things that nina talked about needlessly. >>> next up, continuing this topic, how to fight another war, and the push back coming not very loud but still coming. max and penny ke
aggressive when you look on the policy of drones, going in and getting osama bin laden, something the bush administration failed to do. and he's alsoing more cautious. if you look at the way we dealt with libya and egypt, sort of backing off and sort of supporting what we saw as the goals of the arab street without putting boots on the ground, so this president who was famously cautious about iraq is now in an awkward position. the things we were told about saddam hussein are actually true in libya, and we have this caution. >> we are talking about the republicans in their her to the president, a lot of people were questioning where they were yesterday at the march on washington, the celebration. we have dr. martin luther king's speech yesterday, but i want to show -- i'm sorry. we don't have that sound, but what i do have is the information that john boehner and eric cantor were invited to be there, and they decided not to be there. mlk was a registered republican, wasn't he? >> according to one family member. >> his father was. >> his father was. >> why would republicans take a distant a
about the intelligence community tracking of osama bin laden. the raid it says was guided by a group of satellites in space which pointed dozens of separate receivers of pakistan to collect a vast amount of data as the mission took place. it noticed the united states watches allies and enemies. counter intelligence operations are strategically focused against targets of china, russia, iran, cuba and israel. >> i don't think that would surprise anybody who we are collecting against and also what we think our major concerns are in the world. it makes sense to have that in the budget. it would be better for it nout to be out in the public domain. >> reporter: north korea says what are described as five critical gaps in u.s. intelligence about nuclear and missile programs and analysts knowing almost nothing about the intentions of new leader, kim jong-un. interesting that it was revealed in a story leaked by former contract employee, snowden, one of their own. >> much more on this with the panel. >>> a disturbing look at the fort hood shooter before his attack. >>> here is what our fox a
in "the washington post" offering more detail about the raid that killed osama bin laden, it says forensic intelligence agents working in afghanistan confirmed his identity eight hours after he was killed using dna from his corpse. "the post" information is based on data from leaker edward snowden. >>> friday marks san diego mayor bob filner's final day in office at 5:00, city council president todd gloria will take over as interim mayor and a special election is set for november 19th. gloria allred is celebrating his last day, she represents several women harassed by filner. >>> new york is a great place but it took a couple of kittens to shut down the subway, service came to a halt thursday for 90 minutes as they looked for the fugitive fee lines, the rail could be deadly to an unsuspecting cat. at first there was no luck finding the kittens but they were found hours later and taken to a local animal shelter. it would really anger commuters, but come on, look at that face. >> got to save the kittens. good stuff. >> and they did. that's some good news. we'll take a break here on "new day.
, when you hear the word courier and al qaeda you think of the capture of osama bin laden, a physical courier driving the car that they were able to follow, so we've heard about this before. but this is an electronic trail, that's how they were able to find this. how do they do it? >> so, here's what happened, after a seven-hour internet conference between all of these leaders, the details of that conference, the minutes of it, were given to this courier and he then took it and tried to send it around to a greater distribution list inside the al qaeda community. when he did that, he made some mistakes in his open ratiration security and they were able to catch the mistakes and track him and with the help of the yemeni authorities pick him up and capture him and when they got him they found a video of the entire seven-hour conference call along with a host of all other sorts of goodies about what al qaeda was up to. that is exactly how we found out about the worldwide terror threat that prompted the embassy closings. the courier himself is still in custody somewhere in yemen being held
the u.s. find and kill osama bin laden. the judge cited procedural issues, and ordered a new trial. dr. shakil afridi faced 33 years behind bars for providing money and medical help to islamic militants, allegations he denied. he also ran a vaccination program for the c.i.a. that helped locate bin laden. another major disclosure has emerged from documents leaked by former intelligence analyst edward snowden. the so-called "black budget" details $52 billion in spending this year, for secret u.s. intelligence efforts. "the washington post" reports that, among other things, the national security agency was investigating up to 4,000 reports of possibly security breaches by its own employees, last year. in economic news, the commerce department announced growth last spring was much better than first estimated at an annual rate of 2.5%. the numbers helped wall street overcome worries about syria. the dow jones industrial average gained 16 points to close near 14,841. the nasdaq rose almost 27 points to close at 3,620. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to judy. >> woodruff:
in places even if osama bin laden is not. one other point in there that is not discussed is central africa and what is going on there. >> and malwi and nigeria. >> how does the president need to come out of this to gain credibility and not letting as the congressman said every death spot around the world to utilize destruction. >> that is the quandary he finds himself. this is a president who he first was in power put his faith in word. he thought he could talk the world down from the -- and to some degree, his hands were tied. america was going through an economic crisis. it was extended in two foreign wars. so words were the only real weapon he had at the time. he extended rhetorically an open hand to some of the dictators in the region. they responded with a closed fist. so now he finds himself in a position he has to act and ironically, he has put himself in that position to some degree with saying assad has to go and saying a red line if assad uses chemical weapons against his own people, there will be consequences. the president's own words now force him into action. it's hard to see
. the most famous of all in 1998 when they were launched at osama bin laden in afghanistan only to have three years later launch the 911 attacks against the u.s. >> you're right, indeed. thank you, mick. joining me in studio, congressman gregory meeks, a member of the house foreign affairs committee. representative meeks, i understand you were briefed last night in a conference call. tell me what you learned from that call. >> i learned, first of all, the president has not made a decision yet, which i think is a good thing. >> contingent upon what? do you know what it is will be the tipping point? >> i don't know what it is. i hope he looks at it in its totality. you know, i was with the president most of the time. but i said from the beginning what is beginning is what should be the united states doing something unilateral. what is concerning me is all the reporting i'm hearing now. it's not the international community, it's the united states. it's not nato, it is the united states. >> france said they will offer support. >> there's so many other countries. we don't know, for example, where
with singing songs to osama bin laden and the 9/11 terror attacks. there's been a radical change in a lot of the makeup of the armed opposition which just doesn't look like the peaceful protests that we saw 2 1/2 years ago starting, calling for democracy and freedom after 40 years of dictatorships fr from the assad leadership. >> where does that leave the assad regime right now. fred flepleitgen, a short time , ben wedeman was speaking to members in the regime who told him they were relieve bid this delay, that president obama has put the brakes on at least for ten days asking congress for a vote. the syrian regime, he says, relieved and perhaps even planning a new offensive to squeeze in there over the next several days. before you left, what did you see in terms of movement in the regime's assets and what have you heard over the last several days? >> the regime has been stepping up its effort, especially in the damascus area over the past couple of days. the interesting thing was it really coincided with that alleged chemical weapons attack. many people on the ground were talking to us
with we may have taken out osama bin laden and decimated a good part of the central command of al qaeda, we must continue to realize and we tend to forgot that these franchise cells throughout the middle east have proliferated and it's extraordinary important for us to understand why that threat is diffused for that very reason. >> let's talk about one of those cells. we keep hearing about al qaeda in the arab peninsula. they have an incredibly skilled bombmaker. what else can you tell us about them and how they might be involved? >> it's unclear at this point. there were tli drone strikes in yemen five days last week and a lot of activity going on there. they tried to carry out the 2009 bombing of an airliner flying in detroit that was an underwear bomb. there is increasing sophisticating from that in yemen. problems in yemen troops have been sort of not fighting. they have been rebelling against the government. i think yemen is a real challenge for the obama administration. they have tried to use drone strikes there. they have tried training and it has not worked well. i think they mi
qaeda. sources are telling cnn that osama bin laden's successor, ayman al-zawahiri sent a letter saying, do something. the chatter set off all of this. nick payton walsh is watching this developing. nick, it has been five days since we first became aware of this terrorist threat and what we have seen today, the threat is clearly still ongoing. so why else would the u.s., why would briton, those folks be getting out of yemen? >> reporter: well, certainly the threat whilst being starved, anything from west africa, bangladesh to yemen, even though they thought it would be last sunday, it's ongoing. no one is clear where this is coming from. the state department is continuing to evaluate new information. that withdrawal of diplomatic staff you've been talking about, that has been emotional for a couple of days. the u.s. did repeat its normal travel advice to most americans to get out of yemen and never travel there anyway. a certain escalation on their part today. many asking is it possibly the drone strikes overnight against militants in yemen that may have contributed to that that now bri
, we are accomplishing what we set out to do. because of you, osama bin laden is no more. because of you, al qaeda's top ranks have been handled. the core of al qaeda in afghanistan and pakistan is on the way to defeat. that happened because of you. because of you, more afghans are re-claiming their communities, their markets, their schools, their towns. they have a chance to forge their own future. because of you, more afghans are trained in stepping up and defending their own country. because of you and to preserve the gains you fought and bled for, we are going to make sure that afghanistan is never again a source of attacks against our country. that happened because of you. so the war in afghanistan will end, for you that means fewer deployments, more training time, preparing for the future, getting back to what marines do better than anybody else on earth, amphibious operations. it means more time here on the home front with your families, your wives, your husbands, your kids. but, of course, the end of the war in afghanistan doesn't mean the end of threats to our nation. as
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